Peakbagger.com

Snapshot Year/Month Grid-Highest Point Reached

Larry Grant's Ascents by Year/Month

Links for other Snapshot Grids:Use Metric Color Ranges
  Highest Peak Climbed    Most Prominent Peak Climbed    Most Isolated Peak Climbed    Most Vertical Gain Hiked    Highest Climber-Defined Quality    Top Ascents in all Categories  

 

YearJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
1980      Δ Lassen     
1997      Δ Tinker Knob     
1998      Δ Shasta     
2000     Δ Rainier      
2002      Δ Shasta     
2004      Δ BoundaryΔ Charleston    
2005       Δ Rose    
2007     Δ Rose Δ Washington    
2009       Δ ThielsenΔ WhitneyΔ SiegelΔ ChocolateΔ Peak 9225
2010Δ Spencer Butte Δ MartisΔ GordoΔ MazourkaΔ GalenaΔ PattersonΔ White MountainΔ Granite Δ Hays Canyon 
2011   Δ KumivaΔ Petersen Mountains HPΔ HayfordΔ MontgomeryΔ LassenΔ GrantΔ Middle SisterΔ StarΔ Pond
2012Δ TelescopeΔ Peak 9225Δ DavidsonΔ State LineΔ DesatoyaΔ ReynoldsΔ WilliamsonΔ RitterΔ LangleyΔ RoseΔ KumivaΔ Juniper
2013Δ Nine HillΔ JuneΔ JobΔ JobΔ QuinnΔ AugustaΔ South SisterΔ ThomasΔ North SchellΔ MummyΔ DunderbergΔ Hayden
2014Δ WaucobaΔ GraniteΔ LoneΔ MohoΔ MillerΔ Arc DomeΔ MontgomeryΔ White MountainΔ Gregorys MonumentΔ WashingtonΔ DiamondΔ Clark
2015Δ LincolnΔ KumivaΔ Table Mountain Stillwater RangeΔ JobΔ TobinΔ ShastaΔ Hole in the MountainΔ Lost Cannon Δ JeffersonΔ VirginΔ Peavine
2016Δ Pony BobΔ TiptonΔ Sand Springs Range HPΔ KawichΔ RaweΔ PeavineΔ MoriahΔ BrewerΔ Split Δ PeavineΔ Peavine
2017Δ Table Mountain PlateauΔ CoyoteΔ DonnerΔ Twin Peaks WestΔ Morey Peak NorthΔ JeffersonΔ Toiyabe Dome  Δ InclineΔ Saddle BenchmarkΔ Peavine
2018Δ FairviewΔ PilotΔ Buckley BenchmarkΔ FergusonΔ DelanoΔ CurrantΔ WheelerΔ DiamondΔ Red LakeΔ Half Dome  
2019      Δ Sonoma  Δ Humphreys  
2020    Δ Pantoo Benchmark   Δ McAfee   
2021      Δ Gannett     
YearJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

 

Legend for Color Coding

20,000 feet or more
14,000 to 19,999 feet
10,000 to 13,999 feet
5,000 to 9,999 feet
2,000 to 4,999 feet
Below 2,000 ft

About the Snapshot Year-Month Grid

General Considerations:

  • "-X" after a peak name means an unsuccessful ascent, for example "Rainier-X".
  • A parenthetical name is a non-summit goal hike, for example, "(Snow Lake Hike)" or "(Rainier)".
  • The Δ triangle symbol is a hyperlink to the detailed Ascent Page for that ascent. The peak name is a link to the Peak Page for that peak.
  • The color of the cell shows how high, prominent, isolated, or high-quality the peak/ascent is, and the color ranges are shown in the legend to the left.
  • If the color is based on altitude, prominence, or vertical gain, you can switch between meters-based ranges or feet-based ranges. These are set up to be generally equivalent.

This grid comes in seven "flavors", each one showing a different "top" peak for a month. The flavors or categories are:

  1. Highest Point Reached. Can be an unsucessful attempt or non-summit goal hike.
  2. Highest Peak Climbed. Sometimes not the same as highest point, if that point was an unsuccessful ascent or a non-summit goal hike.
  3. Most Prominent Peak climbed. Note that many peaks in the Peakbagger.com database do not yet have a prominence value.
  4. Most Isolated Peak climbed. Isolation values may not be 100% accurate, since most are cacluated to nearest higher peak in the database.
  5. Peak with most vertical gain hiked. Note that many climbers do not enter vertical gain information on their ascents. Also, if several summits are grouped in a "trip", then the total gain for all ascents in that trip is assigned to the trip high point.
  6. Peak with the highest "Quality" value--this is a subjective number from 1-10 given by the climber. Note that many climbers have not given any of their ascents quality numbers.
  7. Finally, "Top Ascents in All Categories", which shows, for each month, the unique peaks from all the 6 other categories. In many cases, one or two peaks will be the leader in the 6 categories, since often the highest peak climbed for a month is also the highest point reached, the most prominent peak, and the one with the most gain. But in some cases several peaks may appear for a month.




Copyright © 1987-2021 by Peakbagger.com. All Rights Reserved. Questions/Comments/Corrections? See the Contact Page Terms of Service