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Snapshot Year/Month Grid-Highest Point Reached

Tom Sewell's Ascents by Year/Month

Links for other Snapshot Grids:Use Meters Color Ranges
  Highest Peak Climbed    Most Prominent Peak Climbed    Most Isolated Peak Climbed    Most Vertical Gain Hiked    Highest Climber-Defined Quality    Top Ascents in all Categories  

 

YearJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
1978      Δ Homer YoungΔ Ptarmigan Mtn WA    
1979     Δ LoloΔ RockyΔ El Capitan  Δ West Goat 
1980   Δ GuadalupeΔ Baldy Δ WaughΔ Cold Meadows Lookout    
1981      Δ McGuireΔ Stoddard Pk Lookout    
1982      Δ CrazyΔ Sheepeater    
1983      Δ Gannet     
1984      Δ Swan Δ Burwell   
1985      Δ Big St. Josepf Δ Evans   
1986 Δ Snowshead    Δ Gallatin     
1987      Δ McKinley-X     
1988      Δ Southeast Chulu West     
1989      Δ Wilson  Δ Kala Patar NEPAL  
1990      Δ Uncompagre Peak CO     
1991      Δ Yak Mound Nepal     
1992      Δ Jackson     
1993      Δ E. Dead Indian Peak WY     
1994      Δ Windom Peak CO    Δ Big Hatchet Peak NM
1995 Δ Bear Mtn Lookout ID    Δ Harding MT     
1996 Δ Botella Azul Δ Salpa Pass Peak NEPAL  Δ Charleston NV Δ Fortress Mtn WY  Δ Miller
1997Δ Sunset Peak AZ     Δ Vulture  Δ Pennell UT Δ Scalplock
1998      Δ Joffre BC Δ Cloud   
1999 Δ Moose Peak MT    Δ StimsonΔ Harrison BCΔ Pike Peak ?   
2000Δ Mogollon Baldy NM     Δ WheelerΔ Temple (Banff) ABΔ Going To The Sun Mtn MTΔ Chulu Far East Peak NEPAL  
2001      Δ Sneffels Δ Glacier Peak (A-B) MT  Δ North Big Florida Peak NM
2002Δ Big Burro Mtn NM     Δ Ball (Koot) BCΔ Nineteen Peak (Bob) MTΔ Currant Mtn NV Δ Orizaba MEXΔ Volcan Tajumulco GUAT
2003Δ Chirripo COSTA RICA     Δ South Prince Albert Peak BCΔ Argentine Peak Far East BCΔ Bowback (Btooths) MTΔ Volcan Villarica CHILE  
2004  Δ Bandeira BRAZIL   Δ Dome Mtn WYΔ Similarity Mtn (Badshots) BCΔ General (RNRW) ID   
2005      Δ NelsonΔ Slalok Mtn (Coast) BCΔ Wyoming   
2006      Δ Fremont Δ Sphinx Mtn. (Lee-Met) MT   
2007 Δ Bolívar    Δ DelphineΔ Trout    
2009    Δ Eagle CliffΔ Quartz BenchmarkΔ SawtoothΔ Farnham-XΔ Wolf Fang Δ Ko Rah-XΔ (Sarangkot-SE Pk)
YearJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec

 

Legend for Color Coding

20,000 feet or more
14,000 to 19,999 feet
10,000 to 13,999 feet
5,000 to 9,999 feet
2,000 to 4,999 feet
Below 2,000 ft

About the Snapshot Year-Month Grid

General Considerations:

  • "-X" after a peak name means an unsuccessful ascent, for example "Rainier-X".
  • A parenthetical name is a non-summit goal hike, for example, "(Snow Lake Hike)" or "(Rainier)".
  • The Δ triangle symbol is a hyperlink to the detailed Ascent Page for that ascent. The peak name is a link to the Peak Page for that peak.
  • The color of the cell shows how high, prominent, isolated, or high-quality the peak/ascent is, and the color ranges are shown in the legend to the left.
  • If the color is based on altitude, prominence, or vertical gain, you can switch between meters-based ranges or feet-based ranges. These are set up to be generally equivalent.

This grid comes in seven "flavors", each one showing a different "top" peak for a month. The flavors or categories are:

  1. Highest Point Reached. Can be an unsucessful attempt or non-summit goal hike.
  2. Highest Peak Climbed. Sometimes not the same as highest point, if that point was an unsuccessful ascent or a non-summit goal hike.
  3. Most Prominent Peak climbed. Note that many peaks in the Peakbagger.com database do not yet have a prominence value.
  4. Most Isolated Peak climbed. Isolation values may not be 100% accurate, since most are cacluated to nearest higher peak in the database.
  5. Peak with most vertical gain hiked. Note that many climbers do not enter vertical gain information on their ascents. Also, if several summits are grouped in a "trip", then the total gain for all ascents in that trip is assigned to the trip high point.
  6. Peak with the highest "Quality" value--this is a subjective number from 1-10 given by the climber. Note that many climbers have not given any of their ascents quality numbers.
  7. Finally, "Top Ascents in All Categories", which shows, for each month, the unique peaks from all the 6 other categories. In many cases, one or two peaks will be the leader in the 6 categories, since often the highest peak climbed for a month is also the highest point reached, the most prominent peak, and the one with the most gain. But in some cases several peaks may appear for a month.




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